14 Best Lenses For Canon 6D Mark II

Written By:
Bradley Williams
/
Last Updated:
September 3, 2021
Looking for the best lens for Canon 6d Mark II? Here are 14 lens perfect for Canon 6D Mark II as well as the most suitable lens for your specific needs
best lenses for Canon 6D Mark II
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When it comes to full-frame DSLRs, few cameras can beat the Canon EOS 6D Mark II.

It features major improvements from its predecessor including better resolution, top-notch AF system, faster burst speed, 4K time lapse, and even longer battery life.

Not to mention the 3.5mm input so you can use an external mic for better vlogging quality.

However, what is the best lens for the Canon 6D Mark II? With so many brands and options out there, choosing the right one can be a real challenge.

Don’t worry.

Today we’ll talk about how to choose the perfect lens for your Canon 6D Mark II, as well as the most suitable lens for your specific needs.

Here we go!

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Types of Lenses for the Canon 6D Mark II

Before we dive in, it’s crucial to know the types of lenses you can get. Different photography styles will benefit from different lens features.

Prime

Prime lenses have only one focal length which you can’t zoom. While it seems inflexible, this lens type can be great because it typically has faster apertures. This means the sensor can let in more light and thus produce better images in low-light conditions.

Some common prime lenses include the 35, 50, and 85mm lengths. A longer prime lens is desirable for portrait and food shots, while mid-length lenses are more versatile, and shorter ones can be great for wide or landscape photography.

Zoom

On the other spectrum is the zoom lens, which supports a range of focal length so you can manually zoom in and out, depending on the shot you want to make. In other words, it lets you manipulate the framing of an image to be close-up or distant without having to physically move closer or farther away from your subject.

The main benefits of zoom lenses are the versatility and ability to change focal lengths using the same lens. Moreover, zooming in manually will produce better images than doing it digitally in post-processing.

Portrait

You don’t necessarily need a dedicated “portrait” lens to capture beautiful images of human subjects. It simply refers to any lens with the right combination of focal length and aperture to take flattering portraits.

A portrait lens can be a prime, zoom, or even telephoto lens. For example, you can use it to shoot stunning portraits of the interesting people you encounter when backpacking around the world.

Landscape

The same goes with landscape lenses, which generally refers to the best lens you can use for wide-angled shots of sceneries. Typically, you will want a wide-angle, zoom, telephoto, or prime lens for this purpose.

Obviously, wide or ultra-wide angle lenses are the most popular choice. We’re talking about anywhere between 14 and 35mm. It’s because these lenses can capture more of the scenery than longer lenses without losing sharpness.

Macro

A macro lens means it can focus on subjects that are extremely close to the camera. You’ll want this to capture ultra-sharp images of tiny subjects. For example, water droplets, insects, paint textures, foil, and other interesting materials.

The best macro lens will have a 1:1 magnification ratio and 0.3 m of minimum focus distance.

Wide-Angle

We’ve touched on wide-angle lenses, which are essentially lenses that have a short focal length and wide field of view. It’s perfect for taking extensive shots of architecture, interior, and landscape. You can fit as much of the scenery as possible without losing important details in the background.

Telephoto

A telephoto lens allows you to magnify your subject thanks to its incredibly long reach. Usually this is between 60mm and 200mm in focal length. While a telephoto lens can be a zoom lens, it doesn’t have to be.

With a telephoto lens, you can take photos of a sports event from the audience’s seat and dangerous wildlife from a safe distance, like during a safari in somewhere like Sri Lanka. Another benefit is its ability to enhance blurred backgrounds.

What Should You Look For in a Lens?

Next, these are the fundamental aspects of a lens that you should pay attention to.

1. Aperture

A lens aperture is the opening through which light can enter your camera, with a lower aperture number (f/1.2) meaning more light can get in. This lets you capture clear and sharp images even in a dark environment.

Meanwhile, a higher aperture number (f/4) means the sensor opens more narrowly and is better suited for bright conditions. If you’re not specializing in low-light photography, getting lenses with a higher max aperture can save you lots of money.

2. Focal Length

The focal length refers to the optical distance between the camera sensor and point where light converges in the lens. It determines the angle of view and magnification of your images.

You should get longer focal lengths if you want a higher magnification and narrow angles. On the other hand, a shorter focal length is suitable for wide-angled photographs and lower magnification.

3. Image Stabilization

Nothing can ruin a photo more than shaky hands resulting in blurry subjects. While the Canon 6D Mark II has an in-body stabilization for video recording, a lens with optical stabilization can make a huge difference. It will help you take sharp stills and smooth videos.

For instance, when you’re trying to shoot with a low shutter speed, low ISO, and narrow aperture, this feature can prove extremely useful.

4. Weight

Weight is another important yet often overlooked factor when choosing the right lens for the Canon 6D Mark II. Think about how portable you need your overall camera to be. It’s probably a good idea to choose a light lens if you’re backpacking with it. But if travelling is not an issue, you might be able to get away with larger, bulkier lenses.

5. Weather Sealing

Likewise, are you planning to use your camera outdoors or take it on marvellous road trips? Buy a lens that comes with professional weather-sealing to protect it from dirt and other elements. At the very least, you’ll want a lens that can stand light rain, splashes, and dust. This will help keep your lens as long-lasting as possible.

6. Price

Finally, don’t underestimate the significance of price when buying camera lenses! Even the smallest differences in features like aperture and build can drive the price up (or down).

We recommend considering your own priorities regarding the camera usage. Do you really need the widest aperture there is, or can you get away with the f/4 version that’s much more affordable? It’s all about adapting to your personal needs and budget.

Top 14 Best Lens For Canon 6D Mark II

1. Canon EF 50mm f/1.2 L USM - Best All-Round Lens

Canon EF 50mm f/1.2 L USM lens
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Minimum focusing distance: 0.45 m

Focal length: 50 mm

Aperture: f/16-f/1.2

Filter size (diameter): 72 mm

Weight: 580 g

Size (length x diameter): 65.5 mm x 85.8 mm

Everyone needs an all-round lens they can use for a variety of shots. The best focal range would be 50mm, as it’s very close to the human eye’s viewing perspective. The Canon EF 50mm f/1.2 L USM is among the best 50mm lenses you can get.

With that said, note that this is a prime lens. This means you can’t zoom in or out, and may not be the best choice if you’re looking for a zoom lens.

We’d recommend the Canon EF 50mm f/1.2 L USM for anyone who wants to shoot a wide range of images. From landscape and astrophotography to standard portraits and events.

It has a fast aperture, which at f/1.2 means you can capture detailed shots even in low light. Not to mention the stunning bokeh as you can focus on the tiniest objects. We also love the ultrasonic motor that delivers accurate and near silent autofocus.

Additionally, the high-quality lens coating ensures only minimal ghosting and flare, which can make a huge difference in your photography.

We also love that this Canon lens is compatible with neutral density filters, but can still maintain the right exposure and a fast speed. Not to mention that the lens is dust and moisture resistant!

Pros of the Canon EF 50mm f/1.2 L USM

  1. Wide f/1.2 aperture for unrivalled low light performance
  2. Versatile focal range
  3. Reliable and near-silent autofocus

Cons of the Canon EF 50mm f/1.2 L USM

  1. Expensive
  2. Cannot zoom in or out
  3. Not the best up for close-ups

2. Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM - Best Budget Prime Lens

Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM lens
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Minimum focusing distance: 0.45 m

Focal length: 50 mm

Aperture: f/22-f/1.4

Filter size (diameter): 58 mm

Weight: 290 g

Size (length x diameter): 50.5 mm x 73.8 mm

If the previous lens is too expensive for you, the Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM can be a great, more affordable alternative. It offers much of the same features and quality, except for a narrower max aperture of f/1.4.

In other words, it’s a superb prime lens with an equally versatile focal range of 50mm, which also gives you good value for money.

While professionals might want to opt for the f/1.2 version, this one should be perfectly adequate for most casual photographers. In fact, its aperture is still wide enough to take excellent images in low-light conditions.

In addition to the silent autofocus, the Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM is also compact and ultra-lightweight. Meanwhile, the signature Canon Super Spectra coatings can minimize flare and ghosting, while enhancing contrast and more accurate colours.

You can easily use this lens for photography at weddings and other events, or to carry with you in any casual shoots or photo sessions. This includes any overseas trip, to excellent photography destinations like Ireland.

Pros of the Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM

  1. Affordable
  2. Fast and silent autofocus
  3. Stunning bokeh
  4. Great for shooting in low light conditions

Cons of the Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM

  1. Soft corners at wide open
  2. Some chromatic aberration
  3. Mediocre focus ring build

3. Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM - Best Portrait Lens

Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM lens

Minimum focusing distance: 0.95 m

Focal length: 85 mm

Aperture: f/16-f/1.2

Filter size (diameter): 72 mm

Weight: 1025 g

Size (length x diameter): 84 mm x 91.5 mm

The Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM is the go-to lens for portrait photographers and delivers one of the most impeccable performances from.

This short-telephoto lens is the best option for any professionals who want to ensure they can produce the best possible portrait. It offers stunning central sharpness, great contrast, and beautiful colours.

While this lens is an upgrade from its predecessor, the Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L USM, and features a 1.6x faster autofocus, it is still considerably slow compared to other lenses for the Canon 6D Mark II. The good news is that this shouldn’t be a problem for capturing portraits.

Don’t worry, the autofocus still uses the trademark ultrasonic motor mechanism for a near-silent and accurate focusing.

Moreover, the extreme f/1.2 max aperture is perfect for shooting in low light (with no flash) and achieving a shallow depth of field. Not to mention the gorgeous bokeh effect. This lens will give you everything you need for a breathtaking portraiture!

One downside is that this Canon lens is not weather-sealed, meaning you need to be careful when shooting outdoors. At over 1 kg in weight, it can be quite heavy too.

Pros of the Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM

  1. Stunning result for portraits
  2. Excellent sharpness and contrast
  3. Completely silent AF
  4. Beautiful bokeh

Cons of the Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM

  1. Slow autofocus
  2. Not weather-sealed
  3. Quite expensive

4. Canon EF 35mm f/2 IS USM - Best Landscape Lens

Canon EF 35mm f/2 IS USM lens
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Minimum focusing distance: 0.24 m

Focal length: 35 mm

Aperture: f/22-f/2

Filter size (diameter): 67 mm

Weight: 335 g

Size (length x diameter): 62.6 mm x 77.9 mm

When it comes to finding the best landscape lens for the Canon 6D, look for something with a wide angle that can capture crisp images. For that, the Canon EF 35mm f/2 IS USM will not disappoint.

The 35mm focal length is a versatile and popular choice for landscape photography. But it’s also good for interiors, weddings, events, and loosely framed portraits. This prime lens shoots with little to no distortion and chromatic aberration.

Additionally, the Canon EF 35mm f/2 IS USM is also incredibly compact and lightweight, which means it can be the perfect lens to capture the picturesque sceneries during your travels to romantic spots across the globe.

We also love that it comes with optical stabilization to save you time when framing a fleeting shot, or in low light conditions. In addition to the fast and silent autofocus, the 8 blade aperture lets you produce stunning bokeh too.

On the downside, this lens doesn’t come with a hood or weather-sealing, which is a shame considering its price point. Still, it’s a solid wide-angle lens that can take breathtaking shots of the landscape!

Pros of the Canon EF 35mm f/2 IS USM

  1. Compact and lightweight
  2. Quick and silent autofocus
  3. Optical image stabilization
  4. Minimal distortion and chromatic aberration

Cons of the Canon EF 35mm f/2 IS USM

  1. Dim corners at max aperture
  2. Doesn’t include lens hood
  3. DOF scale is limited

5. Canon EF 85mm f/1.4L IS USM - Best Macro Lens

Canon EF 85mm f/1.4L IS USM lens

Minimum focusing distance: 0.85 m

Focal length: 85 mm

Aperture: f/22-f/1.4

Filter size (diameter): 77 mm

Weight: 950 g

Size (length x diameter): 105.4 mm x 88.6 mm

The Canon EF 85mm f/1.4L IS USM offers not only fantastic image quality, it also captures small details in the most beautiful way. With a silent ultrasonic motor and image stabilization, this lens is among one of the best macro lenses for the Canon 6D Mark II.

The wide aperture at f/1.4 delivers an excellent low-light performance. On top of that, this ensures you can get beautiful background blur and shallow depth of field when focusing on small objects. It also makes it great to use in wedding and portrait photography.

Moreover, the 4-stop image stabilisation means you can get smooth images even in challenging conditions.

While some users have complained that the autofocus performance is not the most reliable, we do think it’s still very decent and not something you should worry about. Finally, this lens does come with a lens hood, case, and caps.

Pros of the Canon EF 85mm f/1.4L IS USM

  1. Wide aperture for great background blur
  2. Excellent sharpness even in low-light conditions
  3. Also great for portraits

Cons of the Canon EF 85mm f/1.4L IS USM

  1. Quite heavy
  2. Can be expensive
  3. Autofocus is not the most reliable

6. Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM - Best for Wedding Photography

Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM lens

Minimum focusing distance: 0.38 m

Focal length: 24-70 mm

Aperture: f/22-f/2.8

Filter size (diameter): 82 mm

Weight: 805 g

Size (length x diameter): 113 mm x 88.5 mm

So far we’ve covered mostly prime lenses, so if you’re looking for a versatile zoom lens that is also the best wedding lens for the Canon 6D Mark II, look no further than the Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM.

Offering professional build and sharp optics performance, this lens features a pretty fast aperture and variable focal range for a range of uses. We recommend it not only for wedding photographers, but also casual enthusiasts who want a reliable ‘everyday’ zoom lens.

Of course it features the standard ultrasonic motor for fast and silent autofocus, as well as three aspherical elements for minimal aberration and a circular aperture to produce gorgeous background blurring.

This lens is also very sharp even at max aperture, can produce stunning bokeh, and virtually no distortion and flaring. With that said, there is some vignetting when you’re shooting with the longer focal lengths, and AF is less accurate for closer focusing distance.

Pros of the Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM

  1. Excellent quality optics
  2. Fast and silent autofocus
  3. Professional build with weather-sealing

Cons of the Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM

  1. Some vignetting at wide open and longer focal range
  2. Decreased image quality at closer distance
  3. No image stabilization

7. Sigma 35mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art - Best Travel Lens

Sigma 35mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art lens
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Minimum focusing distance: 0.3 m

Focal length: 35 mm

Aperture: f/16-f/1.4

Filter size (diameter): 67 mm

Weight: 665 g

Size (length x diameter): 94 mm x 77 mm

One of the best Canon 6D Mark II lenses coming from a third-party brand is no doubt the Sigma 35mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art. It also happens to be our top choice for a travel lens, considering it can give crisp images, a wide aperture, and quite affordable compared to similar lenses of this quality.

We adore how sharp the images are when shooting at all apertures. It also features Sigma’s own hypersonic motor for a silent autofocus. This means you can shoot in quiet environments without disturbing them. Admittedly, the AF does perform slower than some other Sigma lenses, but it’s no major red flag.

While this is a brilliant travel lens because of its excellent build and superb results, you can also use it for casual macro photography. The 0.3 m focus distance is short enough that you can approach small objects and still capture all the details in focus.

Our one complaint regarding its optic performance is the heavy vignetting and dim corners, especially at wide open. Not to worry, as this is something you can fix with a bit of editing, even when you’re on the go. Make sure to check out the best travel laptops you can do this with!

Pros of the Sigma 35mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art

  1. Wide aperture for shooting in low light
  2. Superb sharpness and image quality
  3. Low distortion and chromatic aberration

Cons of the Sigma 35mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art

  1. Pretty heavy vignetting
  2. No weather-sealing
  3. No image stabilization

8. Canon EF 14mm f/2.8L II USM - Best Wide-Angle Prime Lens

Canon EF 14mm f/2.8L II USM lens

Minimum focusing distance: 0.2 m

Focal length: 14 mm

Aperture: f/22-f/2.8

Filter size (diameter): 67 mm

Weight: 645 g

Size (length x diameter): 94 mm x 80 mm

The Canon EF 14mm f/2.8L II USM is a great option if you’re looking for a wide-angle prime lens. This means a fixed focal range you can use to take broad shots of landscapes, architecture, interior designs, and tight spaces.

The wide 114-degree field of view is the perfect amount for a wide-angle lens, while the f/2.8 aperture is large enough for shooting in low-light conditions.

It delivers top-grade optical performance with almost no distortion, while the moisture and dust resistance lets you use it in outdoor environments.

As part of the flagship L-series line-up, this lens epitomizes the brand’s ability to produce precise optics with professional performance, as well as quality build with dust and moisture resistance.

You can always couple this with a high-quality travel drone so you can memorialize all the scenic landscapes and architecture during your travels.

Unfortunately, this Canon lens can be quite expensive especially for beginners. But if you want the best wide-angle prime lens and care only for quality, you should consider this!

Pros of the Canon EF 14mm f/2.8L II USM

  1. Edge-to-edge sharpness
  2. Excellent build quality
  3. Virtually no distortion

Cons of the Canon EF 14mm f/2.8L II USM

  1. Quite pricey
  2. Protruding lens is incompatible with front filters

9. Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM - Best Wide-Angle Zoom Lens

Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM lens

Minimum focusing distance: 0.28 m

Focal length: 16-35 mm

Aperture: f/22-f/2.8

Filter size (diameter): 82 mm

Weight: 790 g

Size (length x diameter): 127.5 mm x 88.5 mm

For a wide-angle zoom lens, you can’t go wrong with the Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM. This lens can be an indispensable tool in your toolkit as its 16-35mm focal range gives you flexible control for different perspectives.

Whether you’re a wedding, sports, or street photographer, or even a photojournalist, this can be the only lens you need. Its stunning image quality is complemented by a fast ultrasonic autofocus and rugged design.

Considering it’s quite lightweight for a wide-angle zoom lens, we think this can be the perfect lens to bring when travelling to places with stunning landscapes and sceneries, such as Bali.

Plus, this lens is also a major upgrade from its predecessor in terms of optical performance. It has virtually no issues of coma and lateral chromatic aberration, especially when shooting at 16mm length!

This Canon lens features a special fluorine coating to minimize smearing and fingerprint marks, which will help you keep a clean lens. It’s also resistant to dust, water splashes, and oil, so you can easily clean them with a regular lens cloth.

Pros of the Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM

  1. Versatile wide-angle zoom
  2. Excellent sharpness at wide open
  3. Super-fast autofocus

Cons of the Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM

  1. Soft corners at longer focal lengths
  2. No image stabilization
  3. Some distortion and vignetting

10. Canon EF 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6L IS USM - Most Versatile Lens

Canon EF 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6L IS USM lens
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Minimum focusing distance: 0.7 m

Focal length: 28-300 mm

Aperture: f/38-f/3.5

Filter size (diameter): 77 mm

Weight: 1670 g

Size (length x diameter): 184 mm x 92 mm

We’ve chosen the Canon EF 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6L IS USM as the most versatile lens for the Canon 6D Mark II for a few reasons.

This is for those who want to achieve different effects and framing without having to keep changing lenses. For instance, you can use it as a wide-angle or super-telephoto lens.

However, the trade-off for being a versatile lens that you can use for a vast range of photography types is that it doesn’t do well for shots of the extreme variety. This means it’s not the best lens for shooting in low-light conditions.

Not to worry, as the three-stop optical stabilization can help minimize camera blur when you are using a slow shutter speed.

Its zoom mechanism also uses a push-pull system, which may be strange and unfamiliar for some of you, though this shouldn’t be much of a red flag.

This Canon zoom lens is certainly very heavy (at 1670g) and quite massive in terms of size, making it perhaps not an ideal option for beginners or casual photographers. Yet the build quality of this lens is truly impressive and something every professional would love.

Pros of the Canon EF 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6L IS USM

  1. Impressive 10.7x zoom range
  2. Decent sharpness
  3. Three-stop image stabilization
  4. Comes with hood and tripod collar

Cons of the Canon EF 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6L IS USM

  1. Uncommon push-pull zoom design
  2. Very heavy
  3. Expensive

11. Canon EF 400mm f/5.6L USM - Best Telephoto Prime Lens

Canon EF 400mm f/5.6L USM lens
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Minimum focusing distance: 3.5 m

Focal length: 400 mm

Aperture: f/32-f/5.6

Filter size (diameter): 77 mm

Weight: 1250 g

Size (length x diameter): 256.5 mm x 90 mm

The Canon EF 400mm f/5.6L USM is the lens to go for if you want to capture subjects from a safe distance.

Thanks to its incredible reach and relatively affordable cost, it’s a particularly popular lens for bird photography. The fast autofocus also means you can get accurate shots of in-flight bids. We also recommend it for shooting wildlife or sports-related action from the bleachers.

In addition to the signature ultrasonic autofocus and Super Spectra coating to control flaring and ghosting, this lens also comes with one UD and one super-UD element. This means the best edge-to-edge sharpness.

It’s a shame that this telephoto lens does not have image stabilization, which can be a huge downside when you’re trying to handhold it. You’ll need to ramp up the ISO and have super steady hands. Although, the tripod mount means you can easily use a tripod to get smooth images every time.

Pros of the Canon EF 400mm f/5.6L USM

  1. Sharp images
  2. Very solid build
  3. Relatively lightweight for a super-telephoto lens

Cons of the Canon EF 400mm f/5.6L USM

  1. No image stabilization
  2. Only partial weather-sealing
  3. Not made for low-light conditions

12. Sigma 20mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art

Sigma 20mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art lens

Minimum focusing distance: 0.28 m

Focal length: 20 mm

Aperture: f/16-f/1.4

Filter size (diameter): -

Weight: 950 g

Size (length x diameter): 129.8 mm x 90.7 mm

The Sigma 20mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art offers an outstanding optical performance and large f/1.4 aperture. Plus, the bokeh effects are quite stunning, which can be rare for a lens this wide.

In terms of use, the wide viewing angle makes it an ideal lens for capturing landscapes, portraits, and events. It’s great for both low-light and astrophotography alike, and not a bad choice for capturing the temple interiors and enchanting night skies of Thailand.

Thanks to the improved lens power distribution, this lens manages to reduce spherical and chromatic aberration, as well as distortion to ensure the best image quality. The sharpness is also quite incredible (even at wide open), and the saturated colours will make your photos more vibrant.

The Hyper Sonic Motor mechanism delivers quick, accurate, and silent autofocus. This lens actually has one of Sigma’s fastest autofocus systems.

Interestingly, there is no AF/MF switch as you can simply rotate the focus ring to switch the focusing mode. It’s a much more intuitive and faster way to do it!

It’s also nice that the minimal focusing distance is just 0.28m, which means you can achieve beautiful blurring on the background. While some dim corners are inevitable, you can easily fix these in post-processing.

Pros of the Sigma 20mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art

  1. Excellent sharpness
  2. Large aperture and wide angle
  3. Minimal CA and distortion

Cons of the Sigma 20mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art

  1. No filter thread
  2. Dim corners
  3. Quite heavy

13. Sigma 85mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art

Sigma 85mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art lens

Minimum focusing distance: 0.85 m

Focal length: 85 mm

Aperture: f/16-f/1.4

Filter size (diameter): 86 mm

Weight: 1130 g

Size (length x diameter): 126.2 mm x 94.7 mm

The Sigma 85mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art is another brilliant lens from Sigma’s popular Art line. It’s also one of the best Canon 6D Mark II portrait lenses you can get.

For portrait photography, you’ll want gorgeous bokeh and ultra-high resolution. This Sigma lens definitely delivers, especially because its 14 lens elements ensure the best resolution for stunning portraiture.

The precise focusing is also very impressive, which lets you focus on the eyes and blur out the lashes. Autofocus is also fast and accurate—very useful when capturing portraits. Not to mention minimal chromatic aberrations.

The one downside is that the Sigma 85mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art  is quite heavy and bulky, though if you want the best possible portraits this shouldn’t be much of a deterrent. Because it can be quite expensive, we’d recommend it only for professional or serious photographers.

Pros of the Sigma 85mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art

  1. Excellent image quality
  2. Unparalleled AF performance
  3. Very sharp

Cons of the Sigma 85mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art

  1. Heavy and chunky
  2. Quite expensive
  3. No image stabilization

14. Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM

Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens
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Minimum focusing distance: 0.98 m

Focal length: 100-400 mm

Aperture: f38-f/4.5

Filter size (diameter): 77 mm

Weight: 1640 g (including tripod mount)

Size (length x diameter): 193 mm x 94 mm

If you’re looking for a super telephoto zoom lens for shooting sports and wildlife, the Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM is an excellent choice.

It offers great optics, 4-stop image stabilization, superb autofocus, precise zooming, and stunning bokeh. In short, everything you might need to complete your professional gear bag. This lens also comes with top-gade weather sealing, so you can safely use it outdoors.

While the price can be on the expensive end, the performance you get is well worth it, especially with the excellent colors and contrast. You can enjoy incredible sharpness whether using it at the wide or telephoto mode.

The Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM also comes with built-in optical stabilization, which can be useful to ensure smooth images. But we still recommend using a tripod for an even more stable shot.

Pros of the Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM

  1. Incredible sharpness at all lengths
  2. Great weather-resistance
  3. Optical stabilization

Cons of the Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM

  1. Expensive
  2. Barrel distortion at 100 mm

FAQ About Canon 6D Mark II Lenses

Which lens is better for Canon 6D Mark II?

Just like choosing the best lens for any other camera, you should consider your priorities before picking the best lens for your Canon 6D Mark II. For an all-round lens, we recommend the Canon EF 50mm f/1.2 L USM, which is a 50mm prime lens suitable for a range of uses.

From landscape and portrait to astrophotography, this is a great lens for beginners and amateurs because it gives you everything you might need. Plus, it also has a large aperture for shooting in low light, beautiful bokeh, and excellent autofocus.

What lenses work with Canon 6D Mark II?

All of the lenses we have mentioned today can work on the Canon 6D Mark II. While most of them are from Canon itself, we also included several options from third-party brands that are no less impressive and worth it. These include the Sigma 35mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art and Sigma 20mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art, both of which are compatible with the 6D Mark II.

What lens mount is Canon 6D Mark II?

The Canon 6D Mark II uses the Canon EF Mount. This means it can use Canon EF lenses, which are made to work on both a full-frame or APS-C DSLR. A lot of the lenses from Sigma’s Art line-up can also be used for your Canon camera.

Can I use an EF S lens with 6D Mark II?

While the Canon EOS 6D Mark II is one of the cheapest models you can buy for a full-frame camera, it is unfortunately not compatible with all lenses. You can’t use an EF-S lens with the 6D Mark II. This is because these lenses are made only for APS-C DSLR and not full-frame cameras.

Is the Canon 6D Mark II good for photography?

Yes. As one of the most affordable full-frame Canon cameras, the 6D Mark II is a great choice to have for beginners and experienced photographers alike. It can produce sharp, noise-free images with accurate colours, even when using high ISO.

Additionally, this camera is also great for a wide range of photography, from landscape, portrait, wildlife and sports, to macro and astrophotography. Because it’s relatively small and lightweight, we also love the Canon 6D Mark II as a good blogging camera!

Which Canon 6D Mark II Lens Will You Go For?

That’s all from us on how to choose the best lens for the Canon 6D Mark II.

From the different types you can get and what makes a good lens, to the top lenses in our opinion, we’ve tried to be as comprehensive as possible.

Hopefully, this post can guide you through the buying process.

Whether you need an all-round quality lens, niched macro lens, or something compact for travel, you should be able to find the right one for you.

Are there any other lenses for the Canon 6D Mark II that you think belong on this list?

Comment below and let us know!

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